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20140426
20140504
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
and others. and in germany. >> family members are outraged. they were hurt that these support centers are closing in by a jenning but at some point, an airline has to say, we don't have any more information, right, we have to do this or is this timing particularly bad? >> well, the timing is particularly bad because there is still for the answers where their loved ones are. but in most air crash accidents, certainly all the ones i have worked on, the airline usually closes down its support system and they have a care team assigned member assigned to each family. they cut that off at about day 45 and that's pretty standard and the reason is, that is in most cases, the case is moving on to a different stage, here because they don't have a plane or their loved ones, it's particularly bad timing. it's not unusual to close it down about this point. >> oh, boy, thanks so much to both of you. appreciate it. >> already. the other woman in this clipper owners scandal is talking. what she told barra walters about her relationship with donald sterling and whether she thinks she a racist. first,
to be making much of a difference and now you've got the white house and you've got germany and other members of the european union who are threatening more sanctions. how might that really impact the situation there? >> well, sanctions need to do two things. one, they need to punish the russians for the actions that they've already taken in annexing crimea, illegally, totally unprovoked. the second thing they need to deter the russians from further action. the russians have already gone beyond crimea. they've already sent their special forces into eastern ukraine to stir up trouble, and that's the trouble you're seeing now in eastern ukraine. it is only in eastern ukraine where the russians sent in their special forces that there's any difficulty around that country, around ukraine. the rest of the country is calm. so the sanctions which should go into effect now, the elevated sanctions, the harsher sanctions are necessary now, not waiting for two more weeks. >> the u.s., president obama had been meeting and talking with angela merkel. germany has some leverage in all this, doesn't it? it se
stallone and timbers took the italian stallion to europe and after a successful two-year run in germany -- >> this is show number 56. did you know that? >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: "rocky" is on broadway. >> still feels like we just recently opened. it's great. the set's still, like -- i guess looking kind of run down as it's supposed to. this is rocky's apartment right here. >> reporter: at 35 alex timbers is already a veteran of broadway drawing a claim for shows ranging from "bloody bloodsy andrew jackson" to the pee-wee herman show. still, timbers was an underdog to lead rocky's revival. when you were diving into this project, had you seen the "rocky" movies? >> no i hadn't seen it. >> reporter: how did you do that? how did you come prepared if you hadn't seen the movie? >> an asset. treat the script by a dramatic text. spent pictures pulling this is what boxers look like what philadelphia looks like. i came in and said, this is what my version of "rocky" based on your script would be. >> reporter: this week "rocky" was nominated for four tony a awards including
the sanctions are are not known. >> germany rles on russia -- relies on russia for gas. >> energy flows conditioned during the height of the cold war. the idea that you turp off the tap -- turn off the tap on russian oil and gas exports, i think, is unreallistic. >> barack obama said sanctions could hit the armed sector, finance or lines of credit for trade. the two world leaders held their first meeting in three years, the ukraine crisis bringing them together in a way ta looked unlikely. germany's leaders are angry over n.s.a. eaves dropping on angela merkel's private phone calls. the chancellor saying there's room to cooperate. >> translation: there are differences of opinion over what balance to strike over surveillance to protect sit dispns and preinging the privacy -- citizens and protecting privacy. >> president obama was pawned to see the degree to -- pained to see the degree to which the edward snowden dislorms affected his relationship with germany. he tried to reassure. >> i have taken the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence committees to take the rive si interest
. the two being leaders had their first meetings in almost two years ago. germany's leaders are still angry over revelation he of nsa credit eavesdropping on merkel's phone call. >> translator: there are differences of opinion on what sort of balance the strike between the intensity of surveillance, trying to protect the citizens against threats and on the other hand, protecting the individual privacy and individual freedom. >> reporter: president obama said he was pained to see the degree to which the snowden disclosures had strained both his personal relationship with merkel and strong u.s. alliance with germany and he tried to assure germans that regular citizens are not subject to surveillance. >> ordering our intelligence communities to take privacy of non-u.s. citizens into account in everything you do. thank you very much everybody. >> but the two parted ways, and the you know, doesn't have such an arrangement with any of its closest partners. libby casey, al jazeera washington. >> wiped out an entire village north of kabul in the hills of baarakshon. more than 2,000 people lived
with germany's angela merkel, took yet another shot at russian leader vladimir putin. >> what can't be taken into account is his suggestion that he has the right to violate the sovereignty of another country. that's not acceptable. >> reporter: but here on the streets, the anger is aimed at the united states. we asked this leader who he blames for violence. his answer doesn't need any translation. >> america, america. >> reporter: even as i'm talking, there are groups of armed men roaming the city. and the big question now is, will russian troops invade? diane? >> thank you so much. >>> and now, the breaking story from the man at the center of the nba scandal. 80-year-old donald sterling breaking his silence about his taped comments that earned him a lifetime ban. ryan has this story. >> well, speaking to a magazine about his former companion, he said, i wish i had just paid her off. and also expressed remorse for the way this controversy has unfolded. all this happening as the nba is moving forward on plans to vote on his ouster as owner of the clippers. they will provide him a statement of
, and energy. germany relies on russian energy, but merkel agreed to this to include it as long as her country's inevitable economic pain is shared with other countries. now, today's little meeting with president and merkel didn't go so well, apparently. the president still walking on egg shells over the whole nsa revelation that the u.s. spied on chancellor merkel. asked whether somehow she has trust that has been rebuilt with the president, she dodged simply saying, we have a few difficulties yet to overcome. lester? >> chuck todd tonight at the white house. thanks. >>> house speaker john boehner began appointing a committee today to investigate the september 11, 2012, attack on the u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. and separately the republican chairman of the house oversight committee, darrell issa, subpoenaed secretary of state john kerry to testify about the administration's response to the attack. skipping the usual step of issuing an official invitation to appear. a release of internal white house e-mails with n
of ukraine. "the washington post" quotes him saying he's embarrassed that germany's failure of leadership. he's already made clear that's how he feels about the obama administration refusal to provide defensive weapons. the u.n. security council held its 13th emergency session on the crisis. this one called by russia, which blames the violence on kiev and its western enablers. >>> up next, the new jobs numbers and what they tell us. fox 45 in baltimore with clean up following the collapse of a sidewalk and retaining wall wednesday after it came down after heavy rains over the past 24 hours. take a look at that. >>> fox 31 in louisville with preparations for saturday's 140th kentucky derby. about the timers on the runs for the roses will be getting a little less back if they win this year. this is a live look at new york from fox 5, the big story there ton, a subway derailment in queens that sent four people to the hospital with very serious injuries. six subway cars of a manhattan brooklyn bound express train went off the tracks this morning but remained upright. that's outside the beltway. w
, germany, brazil. who have used columbine as an inspiration. and it's all that publicity that columbine got. the columbine killers they decided they wanted to feel important. and they sought revenge. revenge against their classmates who bullied them. maybe against all of society. and it seems to me that is the motive in this case, as well. >> i know -- i know it's revenge, i know a lot of it is notoriety. how could one not know about columbine even if you were a kid when that happened? i've heard a lot of folks say we, the media, we the public shouldn't be uttering the suspects' names because that then, of course, raises them to a level and elevates them to a level we shouldn't be doing. but do you think that would take away, you know, and some of these other potential school shooters' minds. the troubled minds, the intent to kill? >> first of all, the reporters have a duty to tell the public. and also, the idea of making them into big shot celebrities, putting them on the cover of celebrity magazines. but keep in mind that the copycat factor is inspired by all of this attention. during the
at the u.s. chamber of commerce and she will be focusing her comments on u.s. trade relations with germany. >> republic of germany. >> good morning, everybody. pleasure to a great welcome my friend, chancellor house. to the white germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. and with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief, comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunities for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned that our businesses created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told, our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to --ating good restriction good construction jobs rebuilding america. i want t
. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool? guest: it is limited and a blunt instrument but also there is no other choice. not a lot of other alternatives. politics are flawed, too. germany is russia's's largest trading partner in the eu. they have more economic interest in the u.s. and its owing to be hard to pressure russia and a major way unless the europeans are willing to play. host: let me share what jack lew told members of congress when it came to sanctions and at russia and the wealthy individuals linked to president putin. [video clip] >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy, it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the period of time since russia went into crimea and since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial deterioration in rush's already weak economy. we see and
russian president putin told germany's chancellor that ukraine should withdraw its military from the eastern and southern parts of the country. president obama will meet with german chancellor angela merkel later today. >>> alarming news about greenhouse gases on our planet. new tests show the level of caon dioxide in our atmosphere is now at its highest in human history. one scientist told the san francisco chronicle, it is time to stop building things with tail pipes and smokestacks. >>> here they are. horses and jockeys getting ready for this weekend's kentucky derby. an unpredictable field this year. almost anybody could win in the two-minute race. prerace coverage begins at noon eastern, 9:00 pacific on nbc sports network. don't miss race coverage beginning at 4:00 p.m. eastern, 1:00 pacific, here on nbc. >>> in health news, a problem that keeps millions of americans up all night. now the fda approved a new pacemaker like device to treat sleep apnea. it happens when throat and tongue muscles relax blocking airwaves. the implant keep the air ways open by zapping them with an
and germany. >> what do you think of germany? >> i like it. i have been there nine years and longest i lived anywhere. i consider germany my home in a weird way. and it's definitely a mind-opening experience for me and it's changed my perspective on a national level for the country and also on an international level as well. >> what's your favorite german word? >> oh, that's a good one. probably bergermeister. >> and the bill you want passed. >> i would go along the lines with everyone else, it seems an education bill. living in a military community i have seen the effects transferring through multiple school systems has on students and how the lack of standardization and common goals for education have on students and their futures. >> let's go back in the back here. people we have not been able to talk to. yes, sir. >> my name is daniel rose and i'm the delegate from tennessee. >> where in tennessee? >> memphis. >> the bill i would pass is definitely an immigration reform bill. just looking around the room and being able to talk to every single one of these delegates has been just an aspir
concerning indiana during a recent trade mission to germany. recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine, and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> the continued instability in the middle east and with putin's suppression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust muscle defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of i wanted i understand hoosiers have had a longstanding interest in issues affecting the nation at home and abroad, and i'm no different than that. when i was there, i thought it was important to speak about what i believe would be the right response to russian aggression in ukraine. i'm pleased to hear there's more sanctions maybe coming tomorrow. the truth of the matter is i think we need less talk and more deeds, and by passing and moving rapidly to pass the trans-atlantic trade partnership and, frankly, by deploying a robust missile shield throughout europe, including in poland and the czech republic that was off line in 2009 by this administration i think would send a ve
trade mission to germany, recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine. and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> but to continued instability in the middle east and with putin's aggression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust missile defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of indiana talking about missile defense and not to get too deeply into it, but how do you think setting up a missile defense in the czech republic or poland is going to stop putin who is not involved with missiles but is talking about sending tanks and airplanes over the border or at least threatening to send those over the border into eastern ukraine? how does missile defense help? >> well, first, i was in germany promoting the state of indiana. we have more than 12,000 hoosiers employed by german companies. and more to come. and hoosiers have had a long standing interest in issues affecting the nation at home and abroad. i'm no different than that. but when i was there, i thought it was important
the hearts of men. >> solar number is grown up. it's still got a long way to go. >> germany ranks number one for using the most solar energy, and the u.s. number four. >>> a waiter needs good coordinationing speed and buenos aires puts its waiters to the test. daniel schweimler reports on the art of waiting tables. >> reporter: efficiency, poise and grace are three of the virtuous required. they were all on display at the 10th annual race for waiters and waite reses in the heart of buenos aires. >> dante is a previous winner, with more than 30 years in the job, he knows what is required. >> translation: a good waiter must be friendly, respond rapidly and treat the customers as well as possible, always with a smile they are the main characteristics of a good waiter. >> he's worked at the bar in the legal district serving lawyers and judges for two decades, a profession he loves, because he numbers dealing with the public. an often mallined profession. some practice it with a certain alt of style -- amount of style and pan ash. nowhere is the art of waiting a table better preserved than here i
of the interesting experiences you had is you were in east germany so you became familiar with the horrors of the official propaganda system. the stasi and so forth. you understand the need of information for a free society been in the have not unlike snowden, you are a contractor but then you rose to a high official position. surely, living in washington, as you do, you are probably aware. we had lunch today. i remember when i was reporting for "the l.a. times and the development of a star wars system, i think it just goes to the point i was on tsa or a southwest airlines, a plane going from l.a. to san jose but and edward teller -- maybe not known to all of our students, but he was the father behind the instrumentals very in getting ronald reagan to support star wars. they were going to have an x-ray laser. he said, where you going and i said i am going to the stanford arms-control program. he said make sure sid tells you about the great results we had on the cottage test. we got lazing. true, that would be the biggest change in the military balance. it was the thing that any enemy would
and i remember seeing him when i was a soldier serving in germany. and i stood in ankle-deep mud taking pictures of him for the newspaper for the eighth army infantry division, and i was astounded and enthralled with his deliverance. he was so, so much a man of the people. >> yeah. there was something remarkable about seeing pope john paul ii in person. and you could make the argument he was live and in person by more people around the world than any human being in history. his travels across the globe, he was someone who a lot of people came to see and flocked to see. and there was always this sort of gravitas about him. one of the times i got to see him was actually at the bee at occasion of pope john xxiii. and what was remarkable, there is something about john paul ii, and that something, i think, is what's being recognized tomorrow in both of these men. they're not being made saints because of their accomplishments as pope or because of the things they wrote or said. they're being cannonized, because the church recognizes what is already the case. that these were holy men, and that
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)